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What can the police do?

Have you been subjected to violence or assault, either recently or a while ago? The police can offer advice and guidance, take a formal complaint and evaluate the need for protection.

Both violence in close relationships and sexual assault are punishable offences that the police are obligated to investigate. Reporting an offence can be a vital step towards getting out of a violent relationship.

See this movie about going to the police station:

 

The police must be aware that a punishable offence has taken place in order to intervene and investigate. This could be via you, the victim, reporting the offence, or another person notifying the police on your behalf. If the punishable offence occurred a long time ago – and a parent or perpetrator is deceased – you may still report the offence.

     > checklist when reporting (only in Norwegian)

When the police receive information about a serious case, they will sometimes be able to start their investigation and instigate criminal proceedings without a formal complaint having been made by the rape victim. This is called “public prosecution”.

You don’t have to decide to report the offence before contacting the police

The police can also be a good collaboration partner and provide advice and guidance. You don’t have to decide to report the offence before contacting the police, nor do you have to state your name or the name of other parties who are involved. The police can offer an interpreter, when necessary.

If you feel threatened, the police will consider solutions with you and take protective measures, when necessary.

     > protective measures for people exposed to violence and threats (only in Norwegian)


If you are in acute danger, call the police on 112

Contact your local police on: 02800

Police website