Forlat siden Nasjonal veiviser
ved vold og overgrep

What is an assault centre?

Have you been subjected to violence from a partner, family member or other person close to you, or are you the victim of rape or another form of sexual assault? Assault centres offer medical help and counselling. You do not require a referral and the service is free. You will receive help regardless of whether or not you wish to report the assault to the police. Certain centres are open 24/7.

The service comprises:

  • counselling in safe surroundings
  • medical examination in order to detect, treat and prevent injuries and infection
  • pregnancy testing
  • forensic examination to secure evidence
  • help in contacting the police        
  • help in contacting a lawyer (free) regardless of report
  • information about follow-up services, crisis shelters and other places to get help

 

You decide whether to make use of all or just some of our services, and someone can accompany you if you wish. You can receive help, even if the assault took place a while ago.

The staff working at the assault centre comprise a doctor, nurses and social workers. The staff have a duty of confidentiality and are therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, except if there is a risk to life and health. Assault centres can offer an interpreter when necessary.

Assault centres are linked to emergency clinics or hospitals and are a part of the public health service.

     > List of Norway’s assault centres

Emergency clinic

If it is difficult for you to reach your closest assault centre (e.g. because of extreme weather conditions or long distances), you can contact an emergency clinic. The emergency clinic will assist you. Some emergency clinics can also perform forensic examinations in order to secure evidence. Call 116 117 for information about your closest emergency clinic.

The Aftenposten newspaper has made a video of an assault centre in Oslo which shows how a victim of assault is received and which services are offered.


Regional list of assault centres

 

What is a crisis shelter?

Crisis shelters are there for those who have been subjected to violence or assault from a partner, family member or other person close to them. You do not need to be experiencing an acute crisis to receive help from a crisis shelter. The shelters offer protection, safety, advice and counselling to women, men and children.

Crisis shelters offer a safe place to live for a limited period, but they also offer a service to people who don’t need to live there. It is free to receive help and live at a crisis shelter. You can visit the shelter directly, without an appointment or referral.

The service comprises:

  • Counselling
  • Help to make contact with the support system
  • Information about rights and possibilities
  • Guidance (including legal advice)
  • Counselling groups and activities
  • Follow-up

You can also call the crisis shelter to get advice. You can remain anonymous, i.e. you don’t have to give your name when you contact a shelter. In addition, relatives of persons subjected to violence, the public support system, schools etc. may contact a crisis shelter to receive information about available help or answers to questions.

Crisis shelters also offer a service for people who don’t need to live there

See this movie about visiting a crisis shelter:

 

Staff at crisis shelters have relevant training and/or experience of working with violence and assault. The staff have a duty of confidentiality and are therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, or if there is a risk to life and health. Other users of the shelter are not allowed to discuss anything concerning your case with others. Crisis shelters can offer an interpreter when necessary.

Every municipality is required to offer a crisis shelter service. It is often the case that multiple local authorities collaborate on one crisis shelter. The majority of crisis shelters are adapted to cater for users with reduced mobility, and the local authority must identify alternative solutions if such provision does not exist.

The Secretariat of the Shelter Movement is a member organisation for crisis shelters and is also responsible for running ROSA, which works with victims of human trafficking used for the purposes of prostitution. You can read more about the Secretariat of the Shelter Movement's work on its website.


List of all crisis shelters in Norway

The Secretariat of the Shelter Movement’s website (in Norwegian only)

Have you been subjected to violence or assault? What can the child health clinic and school health service offer you?

Have you been subjected to assault, or have you experienced violence at home? The child health clinic and school health service is a voluntary and free service for children and young persons from 0 to 20 years of age, as well as for parents or expectant parents, and can be a good place to discuss issues.

The child health clinic and school health service offer health checks, vaccinations, home visits, health information and advice. An important part of the work is the prevention of violence and sexual assault, including  female genital mutilation and honour-related violence. The child health clinic and school health service offer assistance to both individuals, families and groups.

Child health clinics/school health services cooperate closely with other municipal health services, and can also assist with referrals to, follow-up of and contact with other parts of the support system. Cooperating with schools and parents can also be relevant at a youth health clinic, but it is your decision whether there shall be any cooperation with other parties.

See this movie about visiting the school nurse:

 

A doctor and health visitor will work at most locations, while at other locations you will also be able to meet midwives, psychologists or other professionals who can help you. The staff have a duty of confidentiality and are therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, or if there is a risk to life and health. Child health clinics/school health services can offer an interpreter, when necessary.

Youth health clinic

Youth health clinics are a supplement to the school health service. The service is directed at young persons up to 20 years of age. However, some local authorities have extended the service to young persons up to 24 years of age. The health service for young persons is a service for young persons who want to talk to an adult about major and minor problems. The service offers advice, guidance, examinations and treatment suited to the needs of young persons and is provided on their own terms.

Young persons who do not attend school also are entitled to receive assistance from the health clinic.

The health service for young persons is a service for young persons who want to talk to an adult about major and minor problems

Pregnancy care

Pregnancy care and follow-up of the family and new-born infant is also an important part of the health clinics’ services. Health clinics offer information and relationship and parent counselling to pregnant women and new parents. As a part of pregnancy care, health personnel are encouraged to ask all pregnant women questions about violence – both current and previous experiences of violence. Thus, the health clinic is a place where you can take the initiative to raise questions associated with violence, for example, if you and/or your children have been subjected to violence

Health clinics also offer assistance to people who struggle to stay in control of their emotions and are aggressive and perhaps violent..

Health clinics are part of the public health service.


A list of health clinics and school health services is available on your local authority website

Help to find a health clinic

What is the Child Welfare Service?

Are you a child experiencing difficulties at home, or are you an adult who is concerned about a child or young person? The Child Welfare Service provides children, young persons and families with help and support when they are experiencing difficulties at home, when a child is not receiving the care it needs or requires help for other reasons.

The Child Welfare Service is tasked with providing assistance when persons under 18 years of age have been subjected to or are at risk of being subjected to violence or assault, female genital mutilation, forced marriage or threats of same. Other examples of situations in which the Child Welfare Service can help is if parents are abusing drugs or alcohol or when a child has serious behavioural problems or problems associated with criminality or drug/alcohol misuse. The help is free.

Help measures directed at the home could be:

  • advice and guidance for the family
  • parent groups
  • support contact
  • financial support for kindergarten place
  • financial support for out-of-school care for schoolchildren (SFO/AKS)
  • financial support for leisure activities or other activities
  • relief support at weekends or visiting home.

"The best interests of the child" is key to the Child Welfare Service’s work (cf. Section 4-1 of the Child Welfare Act – Determining the best interests of the child). Sometimes this may conflict with the parent’s wishes. The Child Welfare Service will help and support parents to enable them to care for their children properly, and their children should live at home, if possible.

In certain serious cases it is not in the best interests of the child to live at home, and the Child Welfare Service must assume responsibility for caring for the child. This could take place with or without the family’s consent. Only the county committee, which is a court-like body, can make decisions about taking children into care when it is against the wishes of their parents.

“The Child Welfare Service will help and support parents to enable them to care for their children properly”

The Child Welfare Service depends on people notifying them of any concerns they may have about a child, so that the child and its family can receive the help they require. Whether you are a private individual or work with children and young persons, you have a statutory obligation to report any concerns you may have.

Most staff in the Child Welfare Service are either child welfare officers, social workers, legal practitioners or psychologists. The staff have a duty of confidentiality and are therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, or if there is a risk to life and health. The Child Welfare Service can offer an interpreter when necessary.

All municipalities in Norway offer a child welfare service. Many local authorities also offer an emergency child welfare centre. The website barnevernvakten.no includes a list of municipal child welfare services and emergency child welfare centres, as well as other useful information

     > Information booklet – ”The Child Welfare Service. In the best interests of the child”


List of municipal child welfare services and emergency child welfare centres

Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs’ website

 

 

Have you been subjected to violence or assault? You can talk to your general practitioner (GP)

Are you experiencing problems with a violent partner, have you been subjected to assault or are you experiencing violence at home? Are you struggling with experiences that happened a while ago? Or are you afraid of being forced into a marriage? You can talk to your GP.

GPs are tasked with helping patients with bodily or physical illnesses, mental health and alcohol/substance abuse. This means that your GP is responsible for all aspects of your health when you are examined, treated and followed up. A GP will often have a good overview of an individual’s health and life situation; a GP can also be a good conversation partner and is experienced in meeting people who have problems.

A GP can be a good conversation partner and is experienced in meeting people who have problems

Your GP has a duty of confidentiality and is therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, or if there is a risk to life and health. Your GP can offer an interpreter, when necessary.

Your GP can also refer you to the specialist health service if necessary or inform you of other agencies that offer help and that do not require a referral – such as  crisis shelters, family welfare offices etc. Your GP is also responsible for coordinating, examining and following up on you when you receive help from the specialist health service etc.

The general practitioner scheme is part of the public health service, and you pay an ordinary user fee.


At helsenorge.no you will find information about GPs and how to change your GP (in Norwegian only)

Have you been subjected to violence or assault? The Family counselling office can help

Is there a lot of arguing and disruption at home? Do you have a violent partner or have you been subjected to assault? Have you witnessed violence between your parents? If so, you can seek help from a Family counselling office.

Family counselling offices offer free help and guidance to couples and families experiencing difficulties, conflicts or crises. The family counselling office works with anger and violence issues, for example. Some offices offer individual services to persons subjected to violence and/or perpetrators of violence.

You can get in touch with your closest Family counselling office to make an appointment or receive information about how the Family counselling office can help you. During busy periods, families with children will be prioritised.

The services offered at family counselling offices vary and could include

  • couples therapy, family therapy,
  • anger management courses and anger management guidance for parents
  • arbitration in the event of separation and relationship breakup, help with parental cooperation and visitation rights
  • parental counselling and various relationship programmes

Staff at family counselling offices include psychologists, educationalists and social workers specialising in family therapy. The staff have a duty of confidentiality and are therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, or if there is a risk to life and health. If the family counselling office is not able to offer the help you need, you may be referred to another agency. Family counselling offices can offer an interpreter when necessary.

Most Family counselling offices are government-run and are part of the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs (Bufetat). Other Family counselling offices are owned by ecclesiastical trusts and have operating agreements with Bufetat. Services are provided regardless of the users' faith and religion.


Search for your local Family counselling office at dinutvei.no

More information on The Family counselling services on the Norwegian Directorate for Children, Youth and Family Affairs’ website

Have you been subjected to violence or assault? What can the mental health service in your municipality offer?

Have you been subjected to violence, rape or other forms of sexual assault and need help to work through what you have experienced? All local authorities offer mental health services, and many have their own municipal psychologist.

There are many ways in which to react following violence or assault. Some people may benefit from talking to a therapist, others also require admission to a psychiatric unit for a while. A GP, psychologist or dentist can, in consultation, assess whether you need such help and refer you if they feel this is necessary. Ask whether those referring you understand that you require a therapist with knowledge of violence and traumas.

All local authorities offer mental health services, and many have their own municipal psychologist

To receive treatment from a district psychiatric centre (DPS) or from a psychologist or psychiatrist who has an operating subsidy (contract specialists), you will require a referral. There are also a number of private psychologists and psychiatrists who practise without an operating subsidy. In such cases you usually do not require a referral, but the service will often be more expensive than treatment at a district psychiatric centre or psychologist/psychiatrist who has an operating subsidy. At a district psychiatric centre or psychologist/psychiatrist you are required to pay the ordinary user fee.

The staff have a duty of confidentiality and are therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, or if there is a risk to life and health. An interpreter can be offered, when necessary.

The waiting time for treatment at a district psychiatric centre varies depending on where you are in the country. If your local district psychiatric centre cannot offer you a good enough service, there is an option for you to be treated at another district psychiatric centre. You can contact the information service “Select place of treatment” for questions regarding services and waiting times on the following telephone number: 800 43 573 (800 HELSE).

     > check the average waiting time at your local centre (in Norwegian only)


List of whom you can contact if you need help or someone to talk to on the website of helsenorge.no (in Norwegian only)

List of private contract specialists (psychiatrists and psychologists)
(in Norwegian only)
contract specialists in Helse Sør-øst
contract specialists in Helse Vest
contract specialists in Helse Midt-Norge
contract specialists in Helse Nord

Find a psychologist on website of The Norwegian Psychological Association (in Norwegian only)

SANKS – a service offering mental health advice to the Sami population (in Norwegian only)

Have you been subjected to violence or assault? What can the Sámi Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Mental Health and Substance Use (SANKS) offer?

Have you been subjected to violence, rape or other forms of sexual assault and need help to work through what you have experienced? SANKS is a competency service that helps the Sami population receive an equal service within mental health and substance abuse.

The service forms part of the specialist health service within the field of mental health at Finnmark Hospital.

There are many ways in which to react following violence or assault. Some people may benefit from talking to a therapist, others also require admission to a psychiatric unit for a while. A GP, psychologist or dentist can, in consultation, assess whether you need such help and refer you if they feel this is necessary. Ask whether those referring you understand that you require a therapist with knowledge of violence and traumas.

SANKS is a competency service that helps the Sami population receive an equal service within mental health and substance abuse.

To receive treatment at SANKS or from a psychologist or psychiatrist who has an operating subsidy (contract specialists), you will require a referral. There are also a number of private psychologists and psychiatrists who practice without an operating subsidy. In such cases you usually do not require a referral but the service will often be more expensive than treatment at SANKS or a psychologist/psychiatrist who has an operating subsidy.

The staff have a duty of confidentiality and are therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, or if there is a risk to life and health. An interpreter can be offered, when necessary.

The waiting time for treatment varies depending on where you are in the country. If the service where you live is not adequate, you can be offered help at another treatment centre.


SANKS’ website (Norwegian only)

Mental health care

What is Protective Services for the Elderly – National Helpline?

If you have been subjected to violence, rape or other forms of sexual assault, or if you are at risk of being subjected to assault, you can call Protective Services for the Elderly. You can receive advice and guidance over the phone.

Everyone over 62 years of age who has been subjected to assault can call Protective Services for the Elderly to receive advice, guidance and help. Relatives, municipal employees or other parties who are concerned or know that an elderly person is being subjected to assault, may get in touch. The service is free.

Protective Services for the Elderly comprises professionals who have time to listen and who have knowledge and understanding of what assault and abuse against elderly persons involves.

You can remain anonymous, i.e. you don’t have to give your name when you contact a centre. The staff have a duty of confidentiality and are therefore not allowed to share any information about you with others without your consent, or if there is a risk to life and health.

Protective Services for the Elderly can offer an interpreter, when necessary.

The service is funded by the Norwegian Directorate of Health.

The Protective Services for the Elderly’s website contains information materials and an e-training programme.


National helpline 800 30 196

Protective Services for the Elderly’s website